Foodlovers Foodtalk Forum

How can I use up some black garlic

Posted by Janet or Emma 
How can I use up some black garlic
February 23, 2019 05:04AM
I’ve got black garlic in my fridge. I don’t particularly love it, and wondered if there were any interesting/delicious ideas to use it. Thanks, Janet
Re: How can I use up some black garlic
March 15, 2019 05:26PM
Black garlic can be eaten alone, on bread, or used in soups, sauces smiling smiley
Re: How can I use up some black garlic
March 19, 2019 08:37PM
I have had black garlic pureed into aioli which was lovely.
Other than that I haven't used it.
Re: How can I use up some black garlic
March 19, 2019 09:17PM
At a restaurant a while ago I had a lovely carpaccio of beef which had little chips of black garlic scattered on it. I can't remember what else it was dressed with, but the black garlic worked really well.
Re: How can I use up some black garlic
March 21, 2019 03:26AM
Thanks. I’ll incorporate it into a sauce or presentation.
Re: How can I use up some black garlic
March 23, 2019 11:25AM
You can make garlic oil if you add black garlic in olive oil
Re: How can I use up some black garlic
March 23, 2019 02:13PM
You'd have to use heat of some description to kill any botulism spores. Never just drop raw garlic into a bottle of oil to flavour it. It's probably worth googling the best way to flavour oil with garlic.
Re: How can I use up some black garlic
March 27, 2019 05:11AM
I wonder which cuisine its comes from, why preserve it in this way, I had a jar given to me years ago which ended up in the bin, I could never get a feel for what I was supposed to it with it either, now I'm thinking Korean or something south east Asian. Might google it tonight or notsmiling smiley
Re: How can I use up some black garlic
March 27, 2019 05:17AM
Mine came in a jar of brine (?) always thought it was normal garlic which had been pickled or something.
Google said:

"Pye says Bredbo’s black garlic is ‘fermented’ in the oven for 60 days. He uses the term ‘ferments’ loosely because, technically, nothing is added to the white garlic to turn it dark. Instead, there’s a chemical process called the Mallaird reaction at play."

Wikipedia:
Black garlic is a type of aged garlic whose browning is attributable to Maillard reaction rather than caramelization, first used as a food ingredient in Asian cuisine. It is made by heating whole bulbs of garlic (Allium sativum) over the course of several weeks, a process that results in black cloves. The taste is sweet and syrupy with hints of balsamic vinegar[1] or tamarind.[2] Black garlic's popularity has spread to the United States as it has become a sought-after ingredient used in high-end cuisine.[citation needed]
Contents

As suspected......
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.

Click here to login

Copyright Foodlovers. All rights reserved.