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What is it that you make that others admire?

Posted by helen 
What is it that you make that others admire?
June 06, 2018 04:40AM
The recent scone discussion made me think about things that we do well that others often ask about. Not specific recipes but more in the way we do things.

For me, aside from my cheese scones, I think it is my roasted potato chunks.
Funnily enough a friend texted this morning from the US asking how I make my potatoes so good.
I always use floury potatoes, I sometimes peel them but often not, wash well, chop into approx 3cm chunks. They are then dried with a tea towel.
I have the roasting pan in the oven which is set at 200 C. Pull it out, put in a good slug of olive oil, add the potatoes, sprinkle with salt and then cook undisturbed for at least 20 minutes, if not longer before turning. I don't turn them until the are really golden and crisp on one side as think that is what makes them appealing.

What is it that you seem to make better than others do?
Oh and how you do it would be good to know as well. smiling smiley



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/06/2018 04:41AM by helen.
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 06, 2018 05:30AM
helen Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
....
> What is it that you seem to make better than
> others do?
> Oh and how you do it would be good to know as
> well. smiling smiley

Curries, South East Asian dishes. I think it's because I don't take shortcuts and don't make substitutions.

Thinking of onions, I am extremely fussy about not leaving cut onion or garlic lying around; I always chop them immediately before using as I hate the stale oxidised flavour that develops on exposure to the air. I think this makes a big difference, and I hate to see tv cooks using pre-cut onions (although I do accept that watching someone chopping onions is not riveting tv).
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 06, 2018 06:22AM
My daughter-in-law thinks that my shortbread (Dean Brett’schneider’s recipe) is the best ever and my son requests my Christmas Stollen and hot cross buns any time of the year when he comes visiting. That might only be every 18 months or so but he asks me for it even at the height of summer. Oh, the buns need to have crosses on top, even in summer.
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 06, 2018 09:43AM
Um, everyone loves my cheese scones at work along with my gingerbread. My vegetarian dishes, veggie mousakka, and veggie chilli. Ithink re vegetarian dishes most people go down the route of meat versions so are surprized the meat free taste so good.
Even though
I don't eat meat, my chicken parmigania, beef olives and moroccan casserole, are well loved
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 06, 2018 09:45AM
Baking in general. I'm very precise (read: anal retentive) when it comes to baking, and things tend to turn out very well.
Bev
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 06, 2018 10:13AM
For me it is my baking and my soups.
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 06, 2018 10:28AM
I usually make good home baking of most types - not always the best presented.....

My Chicken Marbella always gets compliments as does my Lamb Tagine.
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 09, 2018 02:47AM
I make a Pork & Tomato Jam dish that is really tasty & have had to give the recipe out so many times & a great favourite of my families. Happy to give you the recipe Helen but it is a Ray McVi .....one from a very long time ago. Let me know you may be able to put a Helen twist on it. Also a desert called Outrages Pecan Toffee Pudding.



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 06/09/2018 02:50AM by Lyn V.
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 09, 2018 07:32AM
Both sound delicious Lyn, Is the Outrageous Pecan Toffee Pudding Ray's recipe as well?
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 11, 2018 05:22AM
Probably my sourdough and my baking and desserts. My friends have favourites they request. I don't think there's any amazing secret though - just following the instructions seems to work pretty well. Oh yeah, except for cheese scones, which I finally mastered by making the dough very wet (almost spoonable).
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 11, 2018 11:16PM
I'm very happy (read proud) to be able to say I have been acclaimed in Australia for my feijoa cake recipe that a visitor to this forum made back in 2011. Find the recipe and ensuing comments on Juliana's blog here: (the recipe is also in the FoodBank on this website).

[feijoafeijoa.wordpress.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/11/2018 11:21PM by Lorna.
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 12, 2018 01:33AM
Go you, Lorna, it's so nice to have International recognition. smiling smiley.

I am not sure if I can claim any admiration, let alone, fame. If I dig deeply enough, probably the most compliments I have received is for an orange dessert I make, my shortbread and nutty biffs (peanut brownies).
Some used to comment on my homemade sweets, however, as I grew older and wider (not a typo) they are seldom made now.
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 12, 2018 03:48AM
My lambs fry and bacon with caramilised onions and gravy....cut the Lambs fry into strip like stroganoff and flash fry(30secs no longer) in hot oil then make gravy and add the liver back into the pan along with the bacon....and light as air scones.the secret half milk (soured with some lemon juice) and half water and mix with a knife.dont handle too much.into a really hot oven that your tray has been heated before hand......
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 12, 2018 05:41AM
I teach my Asian friends how to read recipes.smiling smiley
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
June 24, 2018 11:20AM
My curries - its really a basic chicken curry BUT I taste taste taste and make sure its full of flavour. I always use chicken thighs and the Empire curry powder. I add lots of garlic and onions and make sure they are nice and soft.

Another success is my chowder - once again simple BUT its all about the flavour. I often use the fishy juice from the smoked fish tin, sometimes without even adding that smoked fish. I at times add dill, curry or cajun spice.

I often dont even bother with cream, just milk made into a roux.

Its all about the flavour, texture and really fresh seafood.

Presentation done nicely too - we do eat with our eyes.

(I know this for a fact when my kids and I bought a bag of doritos and ate them in the car in the dark driving home. As soon as we got home and saw the HORRENDOUS pink/red colour of them we all stopped eating them - no one was tempted after that)

Vanessa
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
July 03, 2018 07:09AM
My Cornish pasties. Made the way I was advised to by the Cornish lady who taught me, which was
NO carrots
Raw ingredients (Swede, onion and potato....end of story)
Swede, not turnip
Finely sliced Swede, potato and onions
Strips of finely sliced skirt steak(or schnitzel at a pinch lol) a friend of mine who loves my Cornish pasties, was rather scandalised when she bought a pasty from the butcher and it contained minced beef! She told him that strips of steak was much better lol
Season all the vegetables and meat in a bowl and use LOTS of fresh black pepper
A strong shortcrust pastry using bread flour(kneaded a little because you don’t want this pastry too short)

Yummy hot warm or cold.
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
July 03, 2018 10:28PM
It shouldn't matter what you put in your 'Cornish' pastie, because it won't be a true 'Cornish' pastie unless you make one end savoury and the other end sweet, as in apple. It's the way Cornish miners would be able to have a main and a dessert in a handy pack while they were down the mine. So insisting swede, not turnip be used, or no carrot, and only sliced skirt steak, is invalid! winking smiley
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
July 18, 2018 05:46AM
I recently made a gluten/dairy free chocolate, beetroot and orange cake (a Nadia Lim recipe, freely available online) for a baby shower, I jazzed up the cake with an orange syrup (not really needed, that is one moist cake!), a chocolate and coconut ganache and an Italian meringue buttercream (made with dairy free spread). I've since been inundated with messages about how good it was, I've had two people contact me wanting to learn to make this cake. So I guess that's something that I make that others admire.
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
July 19, 2018 05:20AM
Lorna, this seems to be a disputed area. The pasty achieved PGI (Protected Geographical Indication) status in 2011, and the specification for that is savoury only as follows:

"Firstly, the pasty must have been made within the geographical county of Cornwall

Then a genuine Cornish pasty must only contain:
— Roughly diced or minced beef
— Sliced or diced potato
— Swede (turnip)
— Onion
— Seasoning to taste (mainly salt & pepper)

The ingredients must be uncooked when the pasty is assembled.

The pastry must be savoury and can be shortcrust, puff or rough puff and must hold all ingredients through cooking and handling without cracking or breaking.

The pasty must be crimped into a D shape, with the crimp towards one side, and glazed with milk, egg or both, before being slowly baked to combine and release all the lovely flavours."
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
July 19, 2018 06:25AM
I think the double-filled pastie that Lorna describes is called a Bedfordshire Clanger. To my knowledge a Cornish Pastie has just one filling, of meat and vegetables, as described by CarolynC.
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
July 20, 2018 12:50AM
I'll agree to disagree. The modern Cornish Pasty may be made just of meat and vegetables, the old fashioned style also had the option of one end savoury and the other end sweet.

A Bedfordshire Clanger is more typically made in a suet dumpling style, not pastry, and again the two sided version is optional.

Now let's debate the pronunciation of pasty. You cannot say it is a vastly nasty pasty eaten very fastly. Nor can you say it's a tasty pasty eaten hastily. It is a mass of sassy pasty eaten with passion. smileys with beer and a beer!
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
July 23, 2018 05:38AM
My post was the way that I was taught to make it, and given that it tastes spectacular hot, warm or cold, I see no reason to change a thing. It’s always seemed to me to be a great example of minimalism in cooking....sure you COULD add all sorts....but it wouldn’t make it any better than the plain and simple version. And I gotta say, NO one, including those from the UK that have eaten them, has complained. Also have to say that I’ve not heard of the pasty being both sweet and savoury. Given they were sized to fit in a pocket, that wouldn’t give you much room for both fillings, unlike in a Clanger which is substantially bigger, tho yes to my knowledge, clangers were steamed. In any case, I still love pasties done the way I was taught.
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
July 25, 2018 01:49AM
I agree with Lorna's comment about the traditional or old fashioned style of the Cornish Pasty. My maternal grandmother's family were Cornish. I was also told the traditional pasty method when I was in Cornwall.
However, whichever way, they are very tasty.
Re: What is it that you make that others admire?
August 04, 2018 11:22PM
Everyone in my family and a lot of people at work love my pumpkin soup. the finger smiley
My mango chili salsa and my feta cheese dip are getting compliments as well.. a all time burner on BBQ's. smiling smiley



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/04/2018 11:26PM by meadowsshadows.
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