Bread sticking to tin
April 23, 2019 08:22AM
Hi all,

I have made a couple of batches of no-knead bread but am having trouble getting it out of the tins as the bread sticks to them. The tins are heavy duty and "almost" non-stick and I oil them well before putting the dough in but the bread still doesn't tip out easily. I have to dig it out with a stiff spatula and chunks of bread gets left behind.

Could I line the tins with baking paper or is this not a good idea? Any tips would be appreciated. The bread is delicious and I would like to keep making it.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 23, 2019 09:13AM
Sue, I have noticed that my bread comes out more easily when I use butter instead of oil. Might be worth a try. If that doesn’t work I would line the tin.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 23, 2019 11:01AM
I'd line the tins with baking paper and see how it goes.
jj
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 23, 2019 11:42AM
I line my tins with baking paper because they are inclined to stick at the corners and the bread is fine with a good crust.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 23, 2019 01:59PM
Have you tried a non stick baking spray such as Sprink or Ease Away? You can get Sprink at some New Worlds, I think, and definitely at Gilmour's, Moore Wilson's etc. I've never had anything stick using this stuff, cakes, muffins, bread, all come out great.

https://www.foodcollective.co.nz/real-ease-cooking-spray-450g
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 23, 2019 03:28PM
I line my tins with baking paper as I don't find anything else works. My bread sticks even with spray in a nonstick tin. I find it does help to have someone help you get the dough in as otherwise the paper seems to get in the way no matter what you do (I use straight sided tins which makes it worse). I get someone to hold the paper against the tin as I scoop, or at a pinch if there's nobody around you can scoop the dough into the paper on the bench then put the whole thing into the tin.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 24, 2019 12:50AM
I seem to recall from my bread-making days that I used to give them a thin film of oil or cooking spray and then a couple of teaspoons of flour shaken around to get good coverage, then tip the pan upside down over the sink or outdoors to remove the excess flour. My bread never stuck to the pan.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 24, 2019 01:06AM
CarolynC Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I line my tins with baking paper as I don't find
> anything else works. My bread sticks even with
> spray in a nonstick tin. I find it does help to
> have someone help you get the dough in as
> otherwise the paper seems to get in the way no
> matter what you do (I use straight sided tins
> which makes it worse). I get someone to hold the
> paper against the tin as I scoop, or at a pinch if
> there's nobody around you can scoop the dough into
> the paper on the bench then put the whole thing
> into the tin.

That was exactly my problem last night. I had to fully line two tins which I recently bought through trademe and which has the coating coming off. My husband had to hold the paper in place. What a kerfuffle. I have decided to turf these tins and buy good quality ones new. I was given a large and heavy commercial tin that seems to have developed a non stick coating over years of use. It was a surplus from a cafe that used to bake its own bread. That tin only needs a light coating of butter and the loaf just falls out. Wish I could get something similar anda bit smaller. Any bread tin recommendations? Saw a heavy duty tin recently but it cost just under $60. Gulp,



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/24/2019 01:07AM by Chris.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 24, 2019 02:05AM
I remember from my bread making days that the only kind of bread that ever stuck to the tins was the no-knead kind. I think the reason is that no-knead bread doesn't have much gluten development and therefore the crumb is not very strong. This means that the crust detaches readily from the body of the bread and if there is the slightest "catch" between the crust and the tin that part of the crust will stay put while the rest of the loaf falls out without it.

Another aspect of no-knead bread is that it is crucial to prove it just to the right level of leavening, if you prove it too long the crust starts to detach.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 24, 2019 06:21AM
Thank you everyone for your advice. I will try some baking paper next time and borrow another pair of hands as I can well imagine the drama getting the dough in! I do have some baking spray, not the brand recommended by Jenna, but I don't think sprays are recommended with these tins.



TPANDAV Wrote:
> Another aspect of no-knead bread is that it is
> crucial to prove it just to the right level of
> leavening, if you prove it too long the crust
> starts to detach.

Sorry, but I'm not much of a cook and am unfamiliar with this process. Can you please explain what the right level of leavening is and how will I know if I prove it the correct time?
J1
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 24, 2019 06:30AM
I've been making my no-knead bread constantly for about 10 years now and I line my tins with baking paper. It's very easy. First you cut one piece/length of paper for both long sides and the base. To estimate how long this needs to be, pull the paper out from the roll over your tin from left to right (the tin is sitting on the bench in front of you, narrow side/end facing you). Cut the paper at your estimated length. Then pull the paper out from the roll again until you think its wide enough to easily cover one narrow side/end. Cut the paper at your estimated length. Then cut that in half again so you have two sort of squares of paper, one for each narrow side/end. Have your pan on the bench with long side facing you. Get your first long length of paper and push it into the pan so it covers the base and runs up both long sides equally. It will sit there on its own. You have your bowl of dough ready to put into the pan. Get a spoon (like a spoon you'd use to eat some ice cream) and *scoop up a big scoop of dough with it and sit that spoonful of dough back in the bowl of dough. Pick up one of your squares of paper and hold it with your left hand (if you're right handed) in its position on the lefthand narrow side/end of the pan, with your right hand pick up your spoonful of dough and plonk it into one of the corners of the pan, so the dough holds the square piece of paper in its position in the pan. Continue to hold the square of paper while you scoop and plonk another spoonful of dough into the other corner of that end of the pan. Turn the pan, so the other narrow side/end is now on your left. Repeat from *. All the baking paper will now be easily held in place by the four corner spoonfuls of dough. Pick your bowl of dough up and tip and scrape the rest of the dough into the bread pan. Level out. Ready for rising.
It may seem terribly fiddly reading all that and figuring out what I mean but once you've done it a few times it becomes extremely simple and easy. The paper doesn't have to be wrinkle/fold free or anything. When the loaf's cooked, you tip it out of the pan (no sticking issues whatsoever), peel off the big piece of paper and then the two end squares and leave to cool on a rack. Presto.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 24, 2019 06:48AM
SueB Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> Sorry, but I'm not much of a cook and am
> unfamiliar with this process. Can you please
> explain what the right level of leavening is and
> how will I know if I prove it the correct time?

No-knead bread is more tricky than conventional kneaded bread as it doesn't have a strong structure.

Proving time is hard to explain if you are not familiar with the breadmaking process. Basically you are waiting for the dough to expand to about one and a half times its original bulk, with a top that is still smooth. If bubbles start to break on the surface it is over-risen and will collapse. If this happens you can rescue it by tipping the dough on to a floured surface and giving it a light knead, then return it to the tin and prove again for about 20 - 30 minutes or until it has increased in bulk again.

If you are keen on making good bread you should read up on the science of it and keep practising. With every loaf, good or bad, you will learn something.

Here's a link to a Delia Smith recipe, which has good instructions.

[www.deliaonline.com]



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/24/2019 06:50AM by TPANDAV.
J1
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 25, 2019 12:31AM
Please don't feel your bread has to be perfect. I've been mucking around with mine for years, throwing in all sorts of different ingredients (at the moment it includes 220g kumara blitzed in the food processor and 50g ground almonds) and seeing what I get. Sometimes I don't get the dry to wet ratio quite good enough and you end up with a loaf that's a bit more crumbly than usual, etc.
I leave mine to rise on our hot water cylinder, generally for about 3 hours but its variable depending on the season and sometimes I forget about it and it rises too much and collapses back a bit (you'll know this has happened if you have a very flat top to your rising bread). I just cook it like that anyway - you still get the same loaf but with a flat top. Really, none of it matters very much - you always get a delicious loaf.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 04/25/2019 12:33AM by J1.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 25, 2019 04:35AM
Or you can do something like this with baking paper. This thread inspired me to make some of J1's vogels-ish bread this morning. I don't usually use the long narrow piece as well, just the wide one across the long sides. I don't so much have issues with sticking (I use a spray I mentioned above), but I do find the paper makes excellent handles to be able to lift the loaf out without damage when it is done.

Note, making a sharp fold in the baking paper with your fingernails along the top edge of the pan helps stop the paper moving around while you're pouring/spooning/sloshing the dough in the pan. You can also poke a nail along the lower folds of the pan, and that helps even more. Doesn't need to be precise, just enough to keep it from moving.

Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 25, 2019 08:50AM
I make no-knead bread, and brush the tins with olive oil (my recipe also includes a small amount of olive oil) I always leave the bread to sit in the tin for 5 minutes or so after it comes out of the oven, then run a knife around between the bread and the sides of the tin. I've very rarely had any trouble getting the bread to come out cleanly, and on the odd occasion that I do, I put the tin on a damp dishcloth, cover it with a teatowel and leave it for another five minutes. This creates a little steam at the base of the bread - enough to get it to come out cleanly. (This method also works for cakes that stick to the tin)
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 26, 2019 02:44AM
Re Jenna's comments about how to get the paper to stay in place, you could also use spring-type plastic clothes pegs or, at a push you could use the push-on ones (excuse the pun), though they may be harder as many bread tins have a rolled edge at the top.

I still prefer to lightly spray then sprinkle in flour, shake it around and up-end the tin to get the surplus flour out. Simpler than mucking around with paper.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 26, 2019 09:46AM
Great idea re cloths pegs, Lorna
Re: Bread sticking to tin
April 29, 2019 11:48AM
Thanks so much everyone for all your explanations and tips, I will print out and give the suggestions a go. I'm sure I'll soon get the hang of it and then the only problem I will have is not eating too much of the bread as it tastes so nice!
joy
Re: Bread sticking to tin
May 16, 2019 01:57AM
I set my bread to rise in the oven. turn it on to lowest heat before I start with ingredients then turn off. when bread is ready to rise I find the heat left in the oven perfect temp for the job. I butter and flour my tins.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
May 26, 2019 11:50PM
Just a thought..................when I line an oven tray with baking paper I wet one side of the baking paper with tap water (wet side down on the oven tray) to stop the baking paper from sliding. It sticks very well. The same practise could be applied to baking paper when lining a bread baking tin. I think it would work OK.
Regards,
Dawn.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/27/2019 07:18AM by Dawn.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
May 27, 2019 12:43AM
Good idea, Dawn. It's possible the damp paper also creates a bit of steam which will give a crusty loaf, if I'm not mistaken. After all, some bakers spray water into the oven as they're putting the bread in. I haven't dared try that as to me, water and electricity don't mix well, and I'm afraid that the spray will hit the element and cause some catastrophy! Am I a wimp? No, I just love life!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 05/27/2019 12:43AM by Lorna.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
May 27, 2019 01:47AM
Dawn, I use water too. I either wet the paper or wet the tin. Paper sticks to tin and then loading is easier.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
May 27, 2019 07:17AM
I agree with you Lorna regarding steam to make a crusty loaf. In the few times I've made bread by hand I have tossed some water into the oven to bake the bread. My oven doesn't have an exposed element on the bottom so I haven't worried too much about this practise causing any problems, but I'd second think it if the element was exposed and in that case I would put an enamel dish or tin pie dish on the bottom rung and put the water in that.
Regards,
Dawn.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
May 29, 2019 11:29PM
Another way to create steam is to throw in a couple of ice cubes. I don't think any oven would have an exposed element on the bottom would they? How would you clean the bottom of the oven properly?
Re: Bread sticking to tin
May 30, 2019 12:01AM
My comment about water and electricity not mixing was due to a well-known breadmaker advising people to use a plastic spray bottle to spray water on top of the loaf as you put it in the oven. I always pictured sparks and hair standing on end at the thought of this advice due to my oven having exposed TOP elements. It has nothing to do with the bottom elements, which in this day and age, are all concealed. It's not that long ago, however, that bottom elements were exposed and I dare say there are a few of these still in use today.

Speaking of concealed bottom elements, do the instructions for your current oven say not to use one of those aluminium splash trays or aluminium foil on the bottom of your oven? Mine does. It would make clean-up so much easier when the occasional accident happens. The instructions don't tell you why not to do this, and I often wonder if it would damage the bottom element or merely act as a barrier to the heat circulating properly.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
June 04, 2019 12:08PM
Hi all,

Just want to update you with my recent results.

I used the baking paper as suggested and my perfect loaves fell out of the tins the second-to-last time I made bread but last weekend I botched things up a bit. My mistake was not turning the oven up to 200 deg after 30 minutes at 50 deg. I decided to give it an extra 10 minutes as it didn't look risen enough.

Bad idea - those 10 extra minutes let the mixture rise too high and start flowing over the sides of the tins. Oops! Won't make that mistake again!!

One thing I am not sure about is whether I should be using the fan-bake function of my oven or are the temperatures of 50 deg C and 200 deg C meant to be fanless? I have been turning the fan on for part of the time to "cover my bases" as I am not sure if it should be on or off and don't want to undercook or overcook the bread.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
June 04, 2019 10:48PM
Unless a recipe states 'fanbake', I go for the regular bake option.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
June 05, 2019 05:27AM
I'm the opposite of Lorna - unless a recipe states conventional oven, I use fan.
J1
Re: Bread sticking to tin
June 05, 2019 09:51AM
Same as Jenna plus mostly I take 10°C off, so if the recipe says 180°C, I'll do fanbake 170°C. The rule of thumb is take 20°C off but my oven seems to get better results with a 10°C change.
Re: Bread sticking to tin
June 05, 2019 10:06AM
Like Lorna I use fanbake only if the recipe says so and also when I use two shelves.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/05/2019 10:07AM by Chris.
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